Chairman Ryan Announces Hearing on the Fiscal Consequences of the Health Care Law

House Budget Committee Hearing to Examine the Impact of the New Law on the Nation’s Unsustainable Fiscal Trajectory

WASHINGTON – House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (WI-01) announced today that the Committee will hold a hearing to examine the fiscal impact of the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” and “Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010.”  The hearing will take place on Wednesday, January 26, 2011, in 210 Cannon House Office Building, beginning at 10:00 a.m.

Background:

Two years ago, President Obama announced that nothing was more important to the goal of closing our long-term fiscal gap than health care reform. But he and his party proceeded to create two new open-ended health care entitlement programs that will add trillions of dollars to our existing liabilities. Claims that the law will reduce the deficit rely on the use of budgetary gimmicks that hide spending, double-count savings, and ignore costly provisions that were selectively stripped from the bill and passed separately.

Furthermore, the open-ended nature of the new health care entitlement builds upon the inflationary architecture of our existing entitlement programs, which have contributed to the skyrocketing cost of health care. Exploding health care costs are bankrupting families, companies, states, and the federal government. Part of this hearing will be dedicated to examining whether the Democrats’ new health care law – with its maze of mandates, dictates, controls, tax hikes and subsidies – will drive costs up even faster.

Witnesses:

The Committee will hear testimony from:

Richard S. Foster
Chief Actuary, The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

Dennis G. Smith
Secretary Designate, Wisconsin Department of Health Services

James C. Capretta
Fellow, Ethics and Public Policy Center

Additional witnesses may be announced. Accommodations for persons with disabilities can be arranged by contacting marsha.douglas@mail.house.gov at least 48 hours in advance of the scheduled meeting.